Bill Whittle Tells It Like We All Should

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The conservative message, and view of America is that we are a nation of steely-eyed missile men with our eyes on a far horizon. We believe in loud guns, hot women, and fast cars. We want to do what we want to do all the time and we don’t like a bunch of high school student council weenies telling us what we can do, when we can do it, or how we can do it. We believe in freedom and prosperity and, if you work your tail off and you want to own seven houses (if seven is your limit), then that’s your business. And if you want to smoke a blunt that’s your business, too. It’s your business, not my business. We believe in limited energy and the power of the human mind to achieve miraculous goals. We have six flags up on the moon, and there’s nothing that we can’t do if we put our minds to it.

What is American Progressivism?

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Glenn Beck posted a helpful perspective on what some people call the third wing of the GOP and the second half of the Democratic platform (the first being Pure Socialism, I guess). Here are the links: Who were the Progressives, and why are they important? The Progressives and their Attack on America’s Founding How the […]

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Government Overreach and the Housing Market

There has been talk of improvement, but we’re still suffering from the devastating financial crisis that originated from excessive government subsidies and mandates on the banking system. Central planning continues as the government overreaches–it doesn’t matter which administration, central planning has dire consequences–has relaunched its campaign to “encourage” home ownership (more subsidies and banking system pressure). I believe that these activities exceed the government’s rightful role. (home prices, housing market, financial crisis, governement)

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Don’t Hurt People and Don’t Take Their Stuff (William Morrow, 2014)

Matt Kibbe is the President and CEO of FreedomWorks, a national grassroots organization that serves citizens in their fight for more individual freedom and less government control. An economist by training, Kibbe is a well-respected policy expert, bestselling author and political commentator, and a regular guest on CNN, Fox News, The Blaze TV and MSNBC. He also serves as Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Austrian Economic Center in Vienna, Austria. Dubbed “the scribe” by the New York Daily News, Kibbe is author of Hostile Takeover: Resisting Centralized Government’s Stranglehold on America, (2012) and coauthor of the New York Times bestseller Give Us Liberty: A Tea Party Manifesto (2010). His most recent book, Don’t Hurt People and Don’t Take Their Stuff was released on April 1, 2014.

In this essential manifesto of the new libertarian movement, New York Times bestselling author and president of FreedomWorks Matt Kibbe makes a stand for individual liberty and shows us what we must do to preserve our freedom.

Don’t Hurt People and Don’t Take Their Stuff is a rational yet passionate argument that defends the principles upon which America was founded—principles shared by citizens across the political spectrum. The Constitution grants each American the right to self-determination, to be protected from others whose actions are destructive to their lives and property. Yet as Kibbe persuasively shows, the political and corporate establishment consolidates its power by infringing upon our independence—from taxes to regulations to spying—ultimately eroding the ideals, codified in law, that have made the United States unique in history.

Kibbe offers a surefire plan for reclaiming our inalienable rights and regaining control of our lives, grounded in six simple rules:

  1. Don’t hurt people: Free people just want to be left alone, not hassled or harmed by someone else with an agenda or designs over their life and property.
  2. Don’t take people’s stuff: America’s founders fought to ensure property rights and our individual right to the fruits of our labors.
  3. Take responsibility: Liberty takes responsibility. Don’t sit around waiting for someone else to solve your problems.
  4. Work for it: For every action there is an equal reaction. Work hard and you’ll be rewarded.
  5. Mind your own business: Free people live and let live.
  6. Fight the power: Thanks to the Internet and the decentralization of knowledge, there are more opportunities than ever to take a stand against corrupt authority.

No nation was ever ruined by trade, even seemingly the most disadvantageous. — Benjamin Franklin

No nation was ever ruined by trade

What do you think Benjamin Franklin meant by “no nation was ever ruined by trade”? Do you think that his words apply to today’s Western economy?

Of course, Ayn Rand was a big proponent of free trade. Value for Value. And Christians, perhaps for the same and perhaps for very different reasons, should view free trade similarly.

Chapter 5 of The Soul of Atlas (entitled “Capitalism“) explores the Christian and the Objectivist view of Capitalism.

With economic turmoil and volatility in the capital markets today, skeptics come out of the woodwork like bugs in an old farmhouse. They question the validity and the viability of Capitalism, particularly the idea of laissez-faire, that the state should not intrude in the economic activities of entities in a free market. Media commentators reference the invalidation of a “free-market economy.” What G. K. Chesterton once said about Christianity can easily be addressed to today’s critics of laissez-faire Capitalism in the West: laissez-faire Capitalism has not been tried and found wanting. Rather, its moral basis has not been found “palatable” so it has not been tried.

Capitalism is Rand’s political system. She defines Capitalism in terms of the fundamental building blocks: a social system based on the recognition of individual rights, including property rights, in which all property is privately owned.

 

Both of my fathers espoused Capitalism despite their adherence to world views which stand opposed on many issues. Ayn Rand understood Capitalism to be the economic system that supports the individual to the greatest extent, the Christian sees Capitalism as an economic system that recognizes and incorporates the inevitability of self-centered human behavior.

Similarly, both of my fathers agree on free trade, but for different reasons. John (a follower of Ayn Rand) sees free trade as a core principle supporting the productive individual who creates value and trades for other values with a reasonable party. While Dad (a Christian) agrees with Ayn Rand‘s assessment, he also sees the ultimate benefit of others. Trading value for value is a means to multiple bottom lines. It’s not charity, but it happens to benefit everyone. There really is such a thing as a “win/win.”

Reason.com

An article headlining this quote was published on Reason.com. Ronald Bailey makes a strong case for free trade and observes that most politicians do not subscribe to it, or cloud their support for it.

So why do people, especially politicians, believe the opposite? The 19th century French economist Frédéric Bastiat explained this sort of disheartening policy myopia his brilliant essay, “What is Seen and What is Not Seen.” People tend to focus on the seen consequences of a policy, in this case, competition from trade eliminating some jobs at relatively inefficient companies.

But they miss the unseen benefits, such as new jobs that result from increased average productivity. Naturally, the people who lose their jobs are worried and angry, so they call their member of Congress to complain about “unfair” trade. Fearing that they may lose their jobs, the denizens of Capitol Hill seek to enact legislation to block imports or mandate “Buy American” to protect their complaining constituents against “unfair” trade. In politics, as in much of life, the squeaky wheels get oiled.

Some of the clearest and most thoughtful rationale for free trade comes from the CFA Institute, an organization of which I am a member and a CFA charterholder. Still, I appreciate Bailey’s simple and straightforward explanation and I hope to hear more from Reason.com on the subject.

Benjamin Frankin
The Life and Miscellaneous Writings of Benjamin Franklin (Edinburgh: William and Robert Chambers, 1839), 80

Kindle Promo Free: The Soul of Atlas is available now!

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I just saw The Soul of Atlas available for Amazon Kindle’s free download… Now! Please jump on this opportunity to download this title for free now to Amazon Prime members. If you’re not a member, email me now and I will see what I can do as an author desiring to promote this title. Thanks!

a-preface-to-paradise-lost-400x400-cslewisThe older poetry, by continually insisting on certain Stock themes–as that love is sweet, death bitter, virtue lovely, and children or gardens delightful–was performing a service not only of moral and civil, but even of biological, importance. Once again, the old critics were quite right when they said that poetry “instructed by delighting,” for poetry was formerly one of the chief means whereby each new generation learned, not to copy, but by copying to make, the good Stock responses. Since poetry has abandoned that office the world has not bettered. While the moderns have been pressing forward to conquer new territories of consciousness, the old territory, in which alone a man can live, has been left unguarded, and we are in danger of finding the enemy in our rear. We need most urgently to recover the lost poetic art of enriching a response without making it eccentric, and of being normal without being vulgar. Meanwhile–until that recovery is made–such poetry as Milton’s is more than ever necessary to us.

Reading John Milton‘s Paradise Lost has been a delight and C. S. Lewis is one of my favorites. In this “Preface” (a series of lectures), Lewis illuminates the entire genre of epic poetry.  Even Ayn Rand recognized the beauty of poetry and art to inspire and elevate to new heights.
What have been your experiences with art and poetry?
In what way do you value art and poetry? Why?
I would love to hear your recommendations.

 

On Goodreads.com

Preface to Paradise Lost
by C. S. Lewis
My rating: 5 of 5 stars


https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1347999313l/207546.jpgThe sixth chapter is entitled “Virgil and the Subject of Secondary Epic.” After arguing that Homer’s subject is not what makes an epic, Lewis seems to say that Virgil’s subject rescues the Aeneid from obscurity when he builds so much depth and substance around his characters and events that we feel as if national, or even cosmic, issues are at stake.

You can find more reviews and discussions of this and many other books on Goodreads.com (including my own reviews and comments about this and other books). It’s one of my favorite sites to help me organize my own reading and keep up with others. When you’re on Goodreads, please visit my author page and “Like” The Soul of Atlas. Consider writing a review and sharing it with your friends on Goodreads and Facebook.com.

 

C. S. Lewis
Preface to Paradise Lost (London: Oxford University Press, 1961), 57

For the New Intellectual by Ayn Rand: a great place to start!

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I’m often asked by people who are interested in The Soul of Atlas, “Do I need to read Atlas Shrugged before I read your book?” The answer, I think, is “No.” But there’s a caveat. If you’re unfamiliar with Ayn Rand and you’re curious, I recommend her shorter work For the New Intellectual. Description This […]

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Paradise Lost by John Milton (Penguin)

In Paradise Lost, Milton produced a poem of epic scale, conjuring up a vast, awe-inspiring cosmos and ranging across huge tracts of space and time. And yet, in putting a charismatic Satan and naked Adam and Eve at the center of this story, he also created an intensely human tragedy on the Fall of Man.

John Leonard’s revised edition of Paradise Lost contains full notes, elucidating Milton’s biblical, classical and historical allusions and discussing his vivid, highly original use of language and blank verse.

From the Publisher

This is the first fully-annotated, old-spelling edition of Paradise Lost to be published in this century. It surveys in its introduction and incorporates in its notes the large amount of criticism published between 1965 and the present–not to mention the criticism that began with Dryden, Addison, Samuel Johnson, and William Blake–and it reflects critical perspectives from New Criticism to Deconstruction, from Philology to New Historicism and Feminism. On the page, the book combines the look and feel of original editions with the convenience of wide margins and thorough annotation.

From AudioFile

Edith Hamilton retells the Greek, Roman, and Norse myths with a sure taste and scholarship that help to restore their quality as perennial and refreshing fables about human nature, including our own.

About the Author

John Milton was born in London on December 9, 1608, and studied at the University of Cambridge. He originally planned to become a clergyman, but abandoned those ambitions to become a poet. Political in his writings, he served a government post during the time of the Commonwealth. In 1651, he went completely blind but he continued to write, finishing Paradise Lost in 1667, and Paradise Regained in 1671. He died in 1674.

On Goodreads.com

Paradise Lost
by John Milton
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Paradise-Lost-Kerrigan.jpgMilton is a brilliant genius. He does no injustice to the biblical text, but he does color it nicely. He draws in the reader who may not otherwise be drawn in to the sacred text and he inspired me to nurture the longing in my soul for God. I found Paradise Lost to be rich with imagery and imagination. I am challenged by his many references to Greek mythology, science, and his far-reaching view of the world. A couple of highlights for me: 1) scenes of the angels worshiping God in Book III, 2) the description of the Son volunteering to rescue the future, yet to be created race through his own sacrifice [Book VII], 3) Milton’s description of the Son descending to vanquish Satan from Heaven, and 4) descriptions of innocence. I appreciated Milton’s portrayal of Satan, but I don’t see Satan as a tragic hero, as that would aggrandize him more than Milton intended IMHO. I recommend Paradise Lost to any serious reader of literature.

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You can find more reviews and discussions of this and many other books on Goodreads.com (including my own reviews and comments about this and other books). It’s one of my favorite sites to help me organize my own reading and keep up with others. When you’re on Goodreads, please visit my author page and “Like” The Soul of Atlas. Consider writing a review and sharing it with your friends on Goodreads and Facebook.com.